Patient Condition and History

Shana is a two-year-old, healthy and active 50lb spayed female Doberman Pinscher. She became suddenly sick with vague signs of lethargy, fever and inability to walk, and was diagnosed with Lyme disease, a common but potentially life-threatening infection.

Lyme disease is caused by the bacteria (spirochete) Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted by ticks. In endemic areas, like the US Northeast, it is estimated that 70-90% of dogs have been exposed to the bacteria. However, only 5-10% of infected dogs show clinical signs of illness1. The most common clinical signs in dogs are fever, lethargy, joint pain and lameness. Most affected dogs respond favorably to antibiotic treatment and show significant improvement within 1-2 days. However, some dogs may develop potentially fatal kidney failure. Close monitoring of vital signs is recommended in the initial 24-48 hours after treatment, to confirm adequate response and rule out kidney failure.

Following diagnosis and initiation of antibiotic treatment, Shana was sent home with a PetPace collar to monitor her vital signs, and specifically her temperature and activity level.

 

Monitoring Data

The proprietary PetPace algorithm noninvasively produces a minuteby-minute evaluation of core body temperature, displaying it in qualitative terms – normal, low or high. Despite some fluctuations, Shana’s temperature was normal throughout the initial treatment phase, as can be seen in the graph below.

 

* The purple line, representing the core body temperature, remains in the normal range (green zone) through the first 24 hours of treatment for Lyme disease.

* The purple line, representing the core body temperature, remains in the normal range (green zone) through the first 24 hours of treatment for Lyme disease.

In addition, Shana’s activity level showed improvement within 24 hours after starting antibiotic treatment, as per the activity chart below.

 

Shana's activity level showed improvement within the first 24 hours following treatment.

Shana’s activity level showed improvement within the first 24 hours following treatment.

 

Additional physiological attributes measured by the collar, including pulse rate, respiratory rate, Heart Rate Variability (HRV), and others, remained stable throughout this time, correlating with the clinical assessment of a positive response to treatment.

 

Discussion

Shana’s vital signs, as detected by the collar, provided the owner and the veterinarian with evidence that she was responding to treatment as expected, and with no complications. PetPace monitored as her fever abated and her activity level improved.

Shana’s case shows how monitoring for fever can be done effectively yet noninvasively and remotely. Fever is one of the main symptoms of Lyme disease in dogs. Frequent measurement of temperature rectally is difficult because of the discomfort to the patient, and the handling and restraint involved. Moreover, in a home setting, such monitoring is challenging and stressful to the owner.

The PetPace smart collar is the first device that can detect fever noninvasively, remotely, and in real-time said Dr. Asaf Dagan, a specialist in canine and feline medicine and surgery, and PetPace’s Chief Veterinarian. Clinical studies show that it is accurate and reliable, and it frees pet owners and caretakers from the unpleasant task of frequent rectal temperature measurements.

Dr. Frank Marchell, Shana’s veterinarian and owner of Piscataqua Animal Hospital in Kittery, Maine, added, The PetPace collar enables me to provide my clients with quality medical care, as well as the peace of mind of knowing how my patients are doing even after they leave the hospital.

 

Conclusions

PetPace’s wearable technology allows, for the first time in veterinary medicine, continuous, noninvasive and reliable monitoring of patient core temperature. This improves patient care in the hospital setting or at home, while freeing both pets and caretakers from the need for frequent and unpleasant rectal measurements. Since temperature data collection is done noninvasively, temperature can be monitored continuously, providing early detection of fever – an essential pet health indicator.

Thanks to the PetPace collar I could let Shana rest and not keep waking her up to check her vitals. While I wish I did not need to find out about this disease, I am so happy to have had this technology to use, said Robin Rubin, Shana’s owner, a certified dog trainer and owner of Mannerly Mutts Dog Training in Maine.